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Zoompf's Web Performance Blog

Zoompf Speaking at Velocity 2012 Ignite

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I’ll be speaking tonight at the Ignite Sessions at O’Reilly’s Velocity conference 2012. Come see me at 7:30 in the main Mission City ballroom as I discuss our recent analysis of HTTP compression usage by the Alexa Top 1000.

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Two Reasons You Should Look at SPDY: 58.23% and 64.33%

Google comes up with lots of interesting technology: PageRank, BigTable, self driving cars. The most interesting invention to me at least recently has been the development of SPDY, Google’s faster HTTP replacement protocol. But will SPDY take off like Gmail? Or end up like Dart, (or Wave, or pubsubhubbub…) Luckily I’ve seen two very important [...]

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How Fast is… Ars Technica?

Our regular video series How Fast Is…? examines real world websites and details the cause of their performances issues as well as what should be done to solve them. After all, the best way to learn about front-end web performance is to see what other people are doing right and doing wrong. In this edition [...]

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Trust (and the Shift Key)

I’ve talked a lot about trust, so this exchange from the Simpsons last night was incredibly funny to me. Homer: Oh Marge, let the kid have his embarrassing secrets and lies. Marge: That is totally irresponsible parenting! Homer: Not according to the Internet. Marge: Where on the Internet? Homer: I’m sure some idiot somewhere agrees [...]

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Too Chunky: Performance and HTTP Chunked Encoding

While debugging a customer issue this weekend, I uncovered a problem with chunked encoding in general, and ASP.NET in particular, that can reduce your website’s performance. Let’s start with some background. Digicure is a web security and performance services company in Denmark. They are also a Zoompf customer. At the end of last week, they [...]

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html5shiv and Serving Content From Code Repositories

There are a lot of interesting findings that came out of my analysis of how the Alexa Top 1000 is using HTTP compression. One finding was that JavaScript is the most common type of content served without compression. I hypothesize that this is due to websites linking to all these 3rd party JavaScript libraries and [...]

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HTTP Compression use by Alexa Top 1000

Yesterday, frontend madman and performance nut Paul Irish reached out to me asking if I had any stats on the use HTTP compression. I’ve written a bunch about the benefits of HTTP compression, as well as the challenges in implementing it. Surprisingly, I realized that, no, I did not have any figures about HTTP compression [...]

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Performance aspects of Google’s HTML/CSS Style Guide

Today Google released their HTML/CSS Style Guide. While it is full of great advice to help manage a growing code base among multiple developers, I thought it would be interested to review the web performance implications of each of its recommendations. Despite being a just style guide, nearly all of its rules had performance ramifications. [...]

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How Do Google’s Animated Doodles Work?

Sunday was Earth Day. As with many holidays or anniversaries, Google celebrated Earth Day with an animated doodle. This is certainly not the first animated doodle that Google has done. Since I have been speaking so much about images recently, I thought it would be interesting to see how Google creates small and fast animations. [...]

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Unsuitable Image Formats for Websites

As I mentioned in our How Fast Is … USPS.com video and blog post yesterday, I discovered a few TIFF files on the US Postal Service’s website. I thought a follow up post about images suitable for use on the web was in order. According to the awesome HTTP Archive, the most common image formats [...]

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